site analysis inspiration

For our next problem, we’re focusing on a very real site – the dreaded shopping center on Pantops Mountain directly east of Free Bridge, the epitome of Charlottesville-Albemarle area sprawl.

So much potential - Riverview Park, Old Mills Trail, history - but so much sprawl.

So much potential – Riverview Park, Old Mills Trail, history – but so much sprawl.

Thankfully, I’ve been tasked with examining the bicycle and pedestrian connections to the site (currently not many), and assessing the site for potential connections. The Old Mills Trail is perhaps one of my most favorite places in Charlottesville – it’s a beautiful place to run or explore along the Rivanna River, and there are some connections to the Pantops Shopping Center that could be strengthened should the space be put to better use. Right now, no bike infrastructure exists in the area, and Free Bridge is plagued with so many lanes of traffic that you have to go up and down the stairs and under the bridge to get to the other side – the process is confusing to the point where I have trouble even articulating it.

I came across some cool visualizations a while ago from I Quant NY, a site that uses open data from New York City to map out and graph out topics of interest, that could provide some useful fodder for inspiring my own site analysis diagrams.

Map of the "treeiest" neighborhoods in Manhattan, with data from a 2005 tree census.

Map of the “treeiest” neighborhoods in Manhattan, with data from a 2005 tree census.

Mapping the prevalence of various street name suffixes.

Mapping the prevalence of various street name suffixes.

This map shows the distances that various neighborhood residents would have to travel to reach the nearest hospital of the struggling Long Island College Hospital couldn't remain alive. It demonstrates the importance of the placement of public buildings in hospital in ensuring equity among various neighborhoods - in this case, equitable access to health care. A LICH vacancy would affect the southeast neighborhoods like Red Hook the most.

This map shows the distances that various neighborhood residents would have to travel to reach the nearest hospital of the struggling Long Island College Hospital couldn’t remain alive. It demonstrates the importance of the placement of public buildings in hospital in ensuring equity among various neighborhoods – in this case, equitable access to health care. A LICH vacancy would affect the southeast neighborhoods like Red Hook the most.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s